Technology Feed

Scientists Solve Mystery of World-Traveling Plant

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 5:36pm
sciencehabit writes "By land or by sea? That's the question scientists have been pondering for decades when it comes to the bottle gourd, a plant with a hard-skinned fruit that's used by cultures all over the world to make lightweight containers and other tools. Archaeologists know that people were using domesticated bottle gourds in the Americas as early as 10,000 years ago. But how did the plant make the jump from its original home in Africa to the New World with an ocean in the way? A new study overturns previous evidence pointing to a human-assisted land migration and concludes that the bottle gourd floated across the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas on its own."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Scientists Solve Mystery of World-Traveling Plant

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 5:36pm
sciencehabit writes "By land or by sea? That's the question scientists have been pondering for decades when it comes to the bottle gourd, a plant with a hard-skinned fruit that's used by cultures all over the world to make lightweight containers and other tools. Archaeologists know that people were using domesticated bottle gourds in the Americas as early as 10,000 years ago. But how did the plant make the jump from its original home in Africa to the New World with an ocean in the way? A new study overturns previous evidence pointing to a human-assisted land migration and concludes that the bottle gourd floated across the Atlantic Ocean to the Americas on its own."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Verizon Discontinues Home Automation Service After 2 Years

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 4:51pm
An anonymous reader writes "Verizon has discontinued its Home Monitoring and Control solution, a $10/month service for do-it-yourselfers that enables remote monitoring and control of security, lighting, thermostats and more. The author notes Verizon 'was attempting to become the first successful provider of a DIY security/automation system that had a monthly fee separate from a professionally monitored security system. ... Providers could (and do) charge premiums of $10 or more for automation and self-monitored security as an attachment to professional monitoring, but not as a standalone service.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Verizon Discontinues Home Automation Service After 2 Years

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 4:51pm
An anonymous reader writes "Verizon has discontinued its Home Monitoring and Control solution, a $10/month service for do-it-yourselfers that enables remote monitoring and control of security, lighting, thermostats and more. The author notes Verizon 'was attempting to become the first successful provider of a DIY security/automation system that had a monthly fee separate from a professionally monitored security system. ... Providers could (and do) charge premiums of $10 or more for automation and self-monitored security as an attachment to professional monitoring, but not as a standalone service.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Sophisticated Spy Tool 'The Mask' Rages Undetected For 7 Years

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 4:06pm
thomst writes "Kim Zetter of Wired's Threat Level reports that Kaspersky Labs discovered a Spanish-language spyware application that 'uses techniques and code that surpass any nation-state spyware previously spotted in the wild.' The malware, dubbed 'The Mask' by Kaspersky's researchers, targeted government agencies, diplomatic offices, embassies, companies in the oil, gas and energy industries, research organizations, and activists. It had been loose on the Internet since at least 2007 before being shut down last month. It infected its targets via a malicious website that contained exploits — among which were the Adobe Flash player vulnerability CVE-2012-0773, affecting both Windows and Linux machines. Users were directed to the site via spearphishing emails."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Sophisticated Spy Tool 'The Mask' Rages Undetected For 7 Years

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 4:06pm
thomst writes "Kim Zetter of Wired's Threat Level reports that Kaspersky Labs discovered a Spanish-language spyware application that employs "uses techniques and code that surpass any nation-state spyware previously spotted in the wild." The malware, dubbed "The Mask" by Kaspersky's researchers, targeted targeted government agencies, diplomatic offices, embassies, companies in the oil, gas and energy industries, and research organizations and activists had been loose on the Internet since at least 2007, before it was shut down last month. It infected its targets via a malicious website that contained exploits — among which were the Adobe Flash player vulnerability CVE-2012-0773 — that affected both Windows and Linux machines. Users were directed to the site via spearphishing emails."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

NASA Now Accepting Applications From Companies That Want To Mine the Moon

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 3:21pm
cold fjord writes "The Verge reports, "NASA is now working with private companies to take the first steps in exploring the moon for valuable resources like helium 3 and rare earth metals. Initial proposals are due tomorrow for the Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown program (CATALYST). One or more private companies will win a contract to build prospecting robots, the first step toward mining the moon. Final proposals are due on March 17th, 2014. NASA has not said when it will announce the winner."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

NASA Now Accepting Applications From Companies That Want To Mine the Moon

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 3:21pm
cold fjord writes "The Verge reports, "NASA is now working with private companies to take the first steps in exploring the moon for valuable resources like helium 3 and rare earth metals. Initial proposals are due tomorrow for the Lunar Cargo Transportation and Landing by Soft Touchdown program (CATALYST). One or more private companies will win a contract to build prospecting robots, the first step toward mining the moon. Final proposals are due on March 17th, 2014. NASA has not said when it will announce the winner."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Adjusting GPAs: A Statistician's Effort To Tackle Grade Inflation

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 3:00pm
An anonymous reader writes "A recent analysis of 200 colleges and universities published in the Teachers College Record found 43 percent of all letter grades awarded in 2008 were A's, compared to 16 percent in 1960. And Harvard's student paper recently reported the median grade awarded to undergraduates at the elite school is now an A-. A statistician at Duke tried to make a difference and stirred up a hornet's nest in the process."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Adjusting GPAs: A Statistician's Effort To Tackle Grade Inflation

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 3:00pm
An anonymous reader writes "A recent analysis of 200 colleges and universities published in the Teachers College Record found 43 percent of all letter grades awarded in 2008 were A's, compared to 16 percent in 1960. And Harvard's student paper recently reported the median grade awarded to undergraduates at the elite school is now an A-. A statistician at Duke tried to make a difference and stirred up a hornet's nest in the process."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

The good, bad of Twitter bios

CNN - Technology Feed - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 2:41pm
If you're a "zombie aficionado," a "Web marketing guru" or a "social media evangelist," you may be doing Twitter wrong.
Categories: Technology Feed

The art of the clever Twitter bio

CNN - Technology Feed - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 2:41pm
If you're a "zombie aficionado," a "Web marketing guru" or a "social media evangelist," you may be doing Twitter wrong.
Categories: Technology Feed

Elon Musk, Tesla CTO Talk Model X Details, Model S Upgrades

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 2:39pm
joe5 writes "Tesla Motors tries to keep product details quiet for the most part, but in a recent Q & A session in Norway (Teslas sell extremely well there) Tesla CEO Elon Musk and the company's CTO JB Straubel discussed some interesting nuggets about the Model S, the upcoming Model X SUV, and the company's planned Model E sedan."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Elon Musk, Tesla CTO Talk Model X Details, Model S Upgrades

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 2:39pm
joe5 writes "Tesla Motors tries to keep product details quiet for the most part, but in a recent Q & A session in Norway (Teslas sell extremely well there) Tesla CEO Elon Musk and the company's CTO JB Straubel discussed some interesting nuggets about the Model S, the upcoming Model X SUV, and the company's planned Model E sedan."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Boom Or Bust: The Lowdown On Code Academies

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:53pm
snydeq writes "Programming boot camps are on the rise, but can a crash course in coding truly pay off for students and employers alike? InfoWorld's Dan Tynan discusses the relative (and perceived) value of code academies with founders, alumni, recruiters, and hiring managers. Early impressions and experiences are mixed, but the hacker school trend seems certain to stick. 'Many businesses that are looking at a shortfall of more than a million programmers by the year 2020 are more than willing to give inexperienced grads a chance, even if some are destined to fail. The zero-to-hero success stories may be relatively rare, but they happen often enough to ensure that the boom in quick-and-dirty coding schools is only likely to accelerate.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

Boom Or Bust: The Lowdown On Code Academies

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:53pm
snydeq writes "Programming boot camps are on the rise, but can a crash course in coding truly pay off for students and employers alike? InfoWorld's Dan Tynan discusses the relative (and perceived) value of code academies with founders, alumni, recruiters, and hiring managers. Early impressions and experiences are mixed, but the hacker school trend seems certain to stick. 'Many businesses that are looking at a shortfall of more than a million programmers by the year 2020 are more than willing to give inexperienced grads a chance, even if some are destined to fail. The zero-to-hero success stories may be relatively rare, but they happen often enough to ensure that the boom in quick-and-dirty coding schools is only likely to accelerate.'"

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

A speaker so loud it will kill you

CNN - Technology Feed - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:51pm
Sound waves from the ESA's Large European Acoustic Facility reach levels so high, they could shake your brain loose.
Categories: Technology Feed

A speaker so loud it will kill you

CNN - Technology Feed - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:51pm
Sound waves from the ESA's Large European Acoustic Facility reach levels so high, they could shake your brain loose.
Categories: Technology Feed

DARPA Seeks the Holy Grail of Search Engines

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:10pm
coondoggie writes "The scientists at DARPA say the current methods of searching the Internet for all manner of information just won't cut it in the future. Today the agency announced a program that would aim to totally revamp Internet search and 'revolutionize the discovery, organization and presentation of search results.' Specifically, the goal of DARPA's Memex program is to develop software that will enable domain-specific indexing of public web content and domain-specific search capabilities. According to the agency the technologies developed in the program will also provide the mechanisms for content discovery, information extraction, information retrieval, user collaboration, and other areas needed to address distributed aggregation, analysis, and presentation of web content."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








Categories: Technology Feed

DARPA Seeks the Holy Grail of Search Engines

Slashdot - Mon, 02/10/2014 - 1:10pm
coondoggie writes "The scientists at DARPA say the current methods of searching the Internet for all manner of information just won't cut it in the future. Today the agency announced a program that would aim to totally revamp Internet search and 'revolutionize the discovery, organization and presentation of search results.' Specifically, the goal of DARPA's Memex program is to develop software that will enable domain-specific indexing of public web content and domain-specific search capabilities. According to the agency the technologies developed in the program will also provide the mechanisms for content discovery, information extraction, information retrieval, user collaboration, and other areas needed to address distributed aggregation, analysis, and presentation of web content."

Read more of this story at Slashdot.








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