Business Feed

Caribbean Numbers Involved in Telephone Phishing Scam

Global Voices - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 12:06pm

If you see a missed call originating in the Caribbean from someone you don't know, it is likely that you have been targeted by perpetrators of the ‘one-ring phone scam’. While the numbers used in these phishing activities can originate anywhere in the world, Slate reports that Caribbean numbers have been noticed with alarming frequency over the past few weeks:

The Better Business Bureau lists calls from Antigua and Barbuda (268), the Dominican Republic (809), Jamaica (876), the British Virgin Islands (284), and Grenada (473) as potential scam threats. People who do call back could be charged something like $30 for the international call, depending on the carrier, and see fraudulent service fees showing up on their phone bills. This process of ‘cramming,’ when third-party scammers sneak bogus charges onto legitimate phone bills, is ever on the rise, according to the Federal Trade Commission and Federal Communications Commission.

Affected persons around the world took to Twitter to report the issue:

Gona go out on a limb here and assume that the missed call I just got from Antigua/Barbuda is not a close friend of mine. If so, sorry.

— Craig Doran (@CDoran19) February 4, 2014

Got a missed call today from Jamaica. Definitely a first. A puzzling, puzzling first.

— Casey Morell (@csymrl) December 14, 2013

Occurrences of these calls have also been reported in Trinidad and Tobago on Facebook. Shelley-anne L Thompson weighed in on the discussion:

I get that like once a month and have never called. come on, people you know this scam! dont let your curiosity trap you.

Maisha Hyman had this to say:

I'm glad to see this! I've recently had hang up calls from Antigua and Grenada! Like wtf?!

Others were more concerned about the impact of the scam on the region. Michael Nahous of Trinidad and Tobago was not amused:

How can they charge you $30.00 without some contract arrangement with the telephone carrier….its only digicel, cable wireless and the local telephone companies in these islands…if they know its a scam why cant they just disconnect the number.

People affected by the scam are being urged to alert their service providers if they spot any unusual charges on their phone bills.

The thumbnail image used in this post is by Milica Sekulic, used under an Attribution 2.0 Generic Creative Commons license. Visit Milica Sekulic's flickr photostream.
Categories: Business Feed

Puerto Rico’s Debt Downgraded to “Junk” Status

Global Voices - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 8:27am

A U.S. quarter, or peseta, as it’s called in Puerto Rico. The expression “everything has gone to hell now” [in Spanish the expressions plays with the word "peseta" that means "quarter"] is commonly used to mean that the cost of living has suddenly gone up or that life has suddenly got more complicated. Image from the public domain, taken from
Wikimedia Commons.

What everybody feared finally happened: Puerto Rico’s debt was downgraded to junk or speculative level on February 4, 2014, by the rating agency Standard & Poor’s. The consequences of degradation had already been mentioned in a previous article [es] by Sergio Marxuach, the Director of Public Policy of the Puerto Rican based think tank Center for a New Economy:

… [U]na degradación del crédito de Puerto Rico a nivel “chatarra” tendría repercusiones adversas para todos los que vivimos en Puerto Rico ya que desataría una crisis financiera. Eso significa, entre otras cosas, que: el gobierno tendría poco o ningún acceso a los mercados financieros; veríamos una depreciación del valor de los bonos y obligaciones de Puerto Rico de entre 30% y 50%; la liquidez y la solvencia de las instituciones financieras y compañías de seguro en Puerto Rico podrían verse afectadas adversamente; veríamos un aumento en las tasas de interés y una contracción significativa del crédito; y aumentarían tanto las quiebras como el desempleo. Nadie en Puerto Rico estaría inmune de los efectos de esa tempestad.

Degrading Puerto Rico’s credit to ‘junk’ level would have adverse repercussions for everybody who lives in Puerto Rico because it would set off a financial crisis. That means, among other things, that the government would have little or no access to financial markets; we would see a depreciation between 30 to 50% of the value of Puerto Rican bonds and obligations; the liquidity and solvency of financial institutions and insurance companies in Puerto Rico could be adversely affected; we’d see an increase in interest rates and a significant credit crunch; and an increase in bankruptcies and unemployment. No one in Puerto Rico would be immune from the effects of this storm.

The degradation of the Puerto Rican debt comes after a series of unpleasant measures implemented by both the New Progressive Party and the Popular Democratic Party, which is currently in power. Among the measures implemented were the laying off thousands of public employees, the imposition of new taxes, and reform of the retirement systems. The Government Development Bank (BGF in Spanish) of Puerto Rico and the Department of Treasury issued a joint press release to calm the concerns of the public, but especially of investors:

Si bien estamos decepcionados con la decisión de Standard & Poor’s, seguimos comprometidos con la implantación de nuestros planes fiscales y de desarrollo económico. Creemos que la comunidad inversora reconocerá oportunamente el impacto positivo de las reformas que la Administración [del Gobernador Alejandro] García Padilla ha implantado.

Entendemos que S&P reconoce los esfuerzos significativos de Puerto Rico hasta la fecha para enfrentar problemas estructurales de mucho tiempo, según queda demostrado por nuestra significativa reforma de retiro, el incrementar la independencia de una serie de corporaciones públicas y los recientes aumentos en los recaudos.

[...]

Estamos confiados en que tenemos a mano liquidez para satisfacer todas las necesidades de liquidez hasta fines del año fiscal, incluyendo cualquier necesidad de efectivo que surja como resultado de la decisión de hoy.

While we are disappointed with Standard & Poor’s decision, we remain committed to the implementation of our fiscal and economic development plans. We believe the investment community will recognize the positive impact of the reforms that the Garcia Padilla Administration has enacted in due course.

We appreciate that S&P recognizes the Commonwealth’s significant efforts to date to tackle long- term structural issues, demonstrated by our significant pension reform, increasing the independence of a number of public corporations, and recent revenue increases.
[…]

We are confident that we have the liquidity on hand to satisfy all liquidity needs until the end of the fiscal year, including any cash needs resulting from today’s decision.

However, Cate Long, market analyst of municipal bonds for the Reuters news agency, who has closely followed Puerto Rico’s situation during the past few years indicated:

Note to financial media covering Puerto Rico & other debt issuers. No one is ever gonna say publicly that they don't have adequate liquidity. — Cate Long (@cate_long) February 5, 2014

For several months, there has been a climate of pessimism in Puerto Rico with regard to the economy, if Twitter comments serve as a barometer for the national mood:

Todos tenemos ahora mismo mejor crédito que nuestro gobierno…

— Ana Maria CV (@anamaria_cv) February 4, 2014

Right now we all have better credit than our government…

Y llegó el #chatarrazo, ahora sí que esto se puso muuuuuyyy malo… — José Armando Santos (@jsantosfigueroa) February 4, 2014

The ‘junk’ is here, and now the situations is verrrrrrry bad…

Ahora sí se pusieron los “eggs” a peseta…#créditopr #pumcayólapiedra

— Karleen Cortes (@KarleenCortes) February 4, 2014

Things have definitely gone to hell now.

Of course, there were also humorous comments amidst the preoccupation:

Anunciamos que, por el momento, no degradáremos sus tuits. Pero mantenemos una perspectiva negativa. #Chatarrazo #CréditoPR — Licen Mangota BB (@ElLicenDice) February 4, 2014

We announce that for now, we will not downgrade your tweets. But the outlook remains negative.

Janizabeth Sánchez produced a Storify [es]  with more Twitter reactions.

Categories: Business Feed

Puerto Rico’s Debt Downgraded to “Junk” Status

Global Voices - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 8:27am

A U.S. quarter, or peseta, as it’s called in Puerto Rico. The expression “everything has gone to hell now” [in Spanish the expressions plays with the word "peseta" that means "quarter"] is commonly used to mean that the cost of living has suddenly gone up or that life has suddenly got more complicated. Image from the public domain, taken from
Wikimedia Commons.

What everybody feared finally happened: Puerto Rico’s debt was downgraded to junk or speculative level on February 4, 2014, by the rating agency Standard & Poor’s. The consequences of degradation had already been mentioned in a previous article [es] by Sergio Marxuach, the Director of Public Policy of the Puerto Rican based think tank Center for a New Economy:

… [U]na degradación del crédito de Puerto Rico a nivel “chatarra” tendría repercusiones adversas para todos los que vivimos en Puerto Rico ya que desataría una crisis financiera. Eso significa, entre otras cosas, que: el gobierno tendría poco o ningún acceso a los mercados financieros; veríamos una depreciación del valor de los bonos y obligaciones de Puerto Rico de entre 30% y 50%; la liquidez y la solvencia de las instituciones financieras y compañías de seguro en Puerto Rico podrían verse afectadas adversamente; veríamos un aumento en las tasas de interés y una contracción significativa del crédito; y aumentarían tanto las quiebras como el desempleo. Nadie en Puerto Rico estaría inmune de los efectos de esa tempestad.

Degrading Puerto Rico’s credit to ‘junk’ level would have adverse repercussions for everybody who lives in Puerto Rico because it would set off a financial crisis. That means, among other things, that the government would have little or no access to financial markets; we would see a depreciation between 30 to 50% of the value of Puerto Rican bonds and obligations; the liquidity and solvency of financial institutions and insurance companies in Puerto Rico could be adversely affected; we’d see an increase in interest rates and a significant credit crunch; and an increase in bankruptcies and unemployment. No one in Puerto Rico would be immune from the effects of this storm.

The degradation of the Puerto Rican debt comes after a series of unpleasant measures implemented by both the New Progressive Party and the Popular Democratic Party, which is currently in power. Among the measures implemented were the laying off thousands of public employees, the imposition of new taxes, and reform of the retirement systems. The Government Development Bank (BGF in Spanish) of Puerto Rico and the Department of Treasury issued a joint press release to calm the concerns of the public, but especially of investors:

Si bien estamos decepcionados con la decisión de Standard & Poor’s, seguimos comprometidos con la implantación de nuestros planes fiscales y de desarrollo económico. Creemos que la comunidad inversora reconocerá oportunamente el impacto positivo de las reformas que la Administración [del Gobernador Alejandro] García Padilla ha implantado.

Entendemos que S&P reconoce los esfuerzos significativos de Puerto Rico hasta la fecha para enfrentar problemas estructurales de mucho tiempo, según queda demostrado por nuestra significativa reforma de retiro, el incrementar la independencia de una serie de corporaciones públicas y los recientes aumentos en los recaudos.

[...]

Estamos confiados en que tenemos a mano liquidez para satisfacer todas las necesidades de liquidez hasta fines del año fiscal, incluyendo cualquier necesidad de efectivo que surja como resultado de la decisión de hoy.

While we are disappointed with Standard & Poor’s decision, we remain committed to the implementation of our fiscal and economic development plans. We believe the investment community will recognize the positive impact of the reforms that the Garcia Padilla Administration has enacted in due course.

We appreciate that S&P recognizes the Commonwealth’s significant efforts to date to tackle long- term structural issues, demonstrated by our significant pension reform, increasing the independence of a number of public corporations, and recent revenue increases.
[…]

We are confident that we have the liquidity on hand to satisfy all liquidity needs until the end of the fiscal year, including any cash needs resulting from today’s decision.

However, Cate Long, market analyst of municipal bonds for the Reuters news agency, who has closely followed Puerto Rico’s situation during the past few years indicated:

Note to financial media covering Puerto Rico & other debt issuers. No one is ever gonna say publicly that they don't have adequate liquidity. — Cate Long (@cate_long) February 5, 2014

For several months, there has been a climate of pessimism in Puerto Rico with regard to the economy, if Twitter comments serve as a barometer for the national mood:

Todos tenemos ahora mismo mejor crédito que nuestro gobierno…

— Ana Maria CV (@anamaria_cv) February 4, 2014

Right now we all have better credit than our government…

Y llegó el #chatarrazo, ahora sí que esto se puso muuuuuyyy malo… — José Armando Santos (@jsantosfigueroa) February 4, 2014

The ‘junk’ is here, and now the situations is verrrrrrry bad…

Ahora sí se pusieron los “eggs” a peseta…#créditopr #pumcayólapiedra

— Karleen Cortes (@KarleenCortes) February 4, 2014

Things have definitely gone to hell now.

Of course, there were also humorous comments amidst the preoccupation:

Anunciamos que, por el momento, no degradáremos sus tuits. Pero mantenemos una perspectiva negativa. #Chatarrazo #CréditoPR — Licen Mangota BB (@ElLicenDice) February 4, 2014

We announce that for now, we will not downgrade your tweets. But the outlook remains negative.

Janizabeth Sánchez produced a Storify [es]  with more Twitter reactions.

Categories: Business Feed

Keeping track of India

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 6:04am
In India, the government is employing the use of biometrics to help identify each person individually.
Categories: Business Feed

Keeping track of India

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 6:04am
In India, the government is employing the use of biometrics to help identify each person individually.
Categories: Business Feed

Transforming UK's landmarks

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 5:48am
Emerging market investments are driving the redevelopment projects in London. John Defterios reports.
Categories: Business Feed

Transforming UK's landmarks

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 5:48am
Emerging market investments are driving the redevelopment projects in London. John Defterios reports.
Categories: Business Feed

Discovering fashion's talent

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 5:48am
As New York Fashion week kicks off, new designers have the opportunity to showcase their work. CNN's Maggie Lake reports.
Categories: Business Feed

Discovering fashion's talent

CNN - Business Feed - Fri, 02/07/2014 - 5:48am
As New York Fashion week kicks off, new designers have the opportunity to showcase their work. CNN's Maggie Lake reports.
Categories: Business Feed

CVS dropping cigarettes

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:41pm
Dropping cigarettes from store shelves "is a very slippery slope for any company,"
Categories: Business Feed

CVS dropping cigarettes

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:41pm
Dropping cigarettes from store shelves "is a very slippery slope for any company,"
Categories: Business Feed

India next big auto market?

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:40pm
Car makers have set their sites on India as the Delhi Auto Expo kicks off. CNN's Maggie Lake has more.
Categories: Business Feed

India next big auto market?

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 9:40pm
Car makers have set their sites on India as the Delhi Auto Expo kicks off. CNN's Maggie Lake has more.
Categories: Business Feed

Work on the Panama Canal Grinds to a Halt

Global Voices - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 11:41am

Photo by André S. Ribeiro on Flickr, under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0)

[Links are to Spanish-language pages except where noted.]

The GUPC (Grupo Unidos por el Canal), a Spanish-led construction group, has completely stopped work on the Panama Canal expansion project [en]. After more than 15 days of negotiations [en] the consortium decided to make good on its threat to shut down construction when its demands were not met. 

Jorge Quijano, the canal administrator, indicated that while conversations between the parties could continue, the window of opportunity was closing and that prompt action should be taken. 

It did not take long for patriotic outrage to make itself heard. 

To better understand the stakes involved, it helps to know that for Panamanians, the Canal is sacred. It was born hand in hand with the nation. More precisely, Panama seceded from Gran Colombia and became an independent country in 1903 with the primary objective of opening up the Canal. As a result, Panamanians feel this crucial stretch of water to be part of their DNA, and since it was opened, they have defended it tooth and nail. Some have gone so far as to call it “the religion that unites all Panamanians.”

This notion was reflected in social media, where politicians of all stripes showed their support for the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), which remains firm in its determination to not negotiate outside the terms of the contract.

The journalist Manolo Álvarez collected the various statements made by Jorge Quijano, who guaranteed that Panama would not let itself be blackmailed by the GUPC and that the ACP was prepared to face them in court. 

Canal no se someterá a ningún chantaje de Gupc y los enfrentaremos en cualquier terreno @radiopanama @canaldepanama pic.twitter.com/86r7Almr06

— Manolo Álvarez C (@manoloalvarezc) February 5, 2014

The Canal will not be subjected to any extortion by the GUPC and we will face them no matter the circumstances

Isabel St. Malo, who is running for the vice-presidency under the banner of the Partido Panameñista [en], tweeted her support for the ACP, pledging that the expansion of the Canal would be done with or without the GUPC.

Respaldamos mensaje del administrador Quijano, terminaremos ampliación con o sin GUPC. ACP, orgullo nacional!

— Isabel St. Malo (@IsabelStMalo) February 5, 2014

We endorse the message of Administrator Quijano, we will finish this project with or without GUPC. ACP, national pride!

Martin Torrijos, former President of Panamá and son of General Omar Torrijos—the man who signed the Torrijos-Carter treaties that returned the Canal to Panama—also indicated he stood behind the Administrator and commented that if they were able to make the Canal Panamanian, then surely Panamanians would be able to expand it. 

La ampliación es nuestra,ellos se van nosotros nos quedamos,como dijo Quijano.Cumpliremos con Panamá.Si lo recuperamos,sin duda lo ampliamos

— Martin Torrijos (@MartinTorrijos) February 5, 2014

The expansion project is ours; they will go, we will remain, as Quijano said. We will fulfill our duty to Panama. If we got it back, there's no question we can expand it. 

Popi Varela, a Partido Panameñista deputy, points out that the mistake made by Sacyr, the Spanish firm leading the GUPC, was to believe that the ACP was just like any corrupt government they could blackmail. 

Sacyr piensa que está negociando con un gobierno corrupto no se han dado cuenta que la ACP es autónoma del Gob Central por constitución!

— Popi Varela (@varelapopi) February 5, 2014

Sacyr thinks they are negotiating with a corrupt government and haven't realized that the ACP is independent of the central government according to the constitution!

With its typical sarcasm, El Gallinazo requests that Panamanians not let “gringos” finish the work and that they themselves pick up the tools and complete the expansion project.

Panamá te necesita! No dejemos q los gringos terminen la ampliación. Agarren sus mazos y coas y vamos a terminar esa vaina nosotros mismos!

— El Gallinazo (@ElGallinazo) February 5, 2014

Panama needs you! Don't let the gringos finish the expansion. Grab your hammers and shovels and we'll finish this job ourselves!

Quintín Moreno opines that the GUPC should not be given any more chances and that another company should be found. 

La ACP debe contratar una nueva empresa para finalizar la ampliación, el GUPC demostró ser desleal y oportunista.

— Quintín Moreno (@quintinmoreno) February 5, 2014

The ACP should hire a new firm to finish the expansion; the GUPC has shown itself to be opportunistic and disloyal.

The impact is being felt in Spain, where the share price of Sacyr plummeted when news hit the financial markets. This is how Mi Diario describes it:

Caen acciones de Sacyr en la bolsa española || http://t.co/86Rk3s0iWN || pic.twitter.com/AHJycga4QW

— Mi Diario Panamá (@MiDiarioPanama) February 5, 2014

Shares of Sacyr fell on the Spanish stock market

R.A. Benta says that this is the beginning of the end of the Spanish “brand” and that the real question is, “Who is going to pay for it all?” 

Hoy Sacyr con el canal de Panana, mañana Arabia Saudí con el Ave,quien pagará estas megafiestas? #MarcaEspana #SíSí pic.twitter.com/wZqDrYbmgy

— R.A.Benta#SISI||*|| (@R_A_Benta) February 5, 2014

Today Sacyr with the Panama Canal, tomorrow Saudi Arabia with the Ave [high-speed train], who's picking up the tab for these megaparties?

Quijano's statements, assuring there is still wiggle room in the negotiations, indicate the ACP believes that the GUPC can complete the work. However, when it comes to Panamanians, patience for the manoeuvres of the consortium seems to have run out. 

Categories: Business Feed

Work on the Panama Canal Grinds to a Halt

Global Voices - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 11:41am

Photo by André S. Ribeiro on Flickr, under a Creative Commons license (CC BY 2.0)

[Links are to Spanish-language pages except where noted.]

The GUPC (Grupo Unidos por el Canal), a Spanish-led construction group, has completely stopped work on the Panama Canal expansion project [en]. After more than 15 days of negotiations [en] the consortium decided to make good on its threat to shut down construction when its demands were not met. 

Jorge Quijano, the canal administrator, indicated that while conversations between the parties could continue, the window of opportunity was closing and that prompt action should be taken. 

It did not take long for patriotic outrage to make itself heard. 

To better understand the stakes involved, it helps to know that for Panamanians, the Canal is sacred. It was born hand in hand with the nation. More precisely, Panama seceded from Gran Colombia and became an independent country in 1903 with the primary objective of opening up the Canal. As a result, Panamanians feel this crucial stretch of water to be part of their DNA, and since it was opened, they have defended it tooth and nail. Some have gone so far as to call it “the religion that unites all Panamanians.”

This notion was reflected in social media, where politicians of all stripes showed their support for the Panama Canal Authority (ACP), which remains firm in its determination to not negotiate outside the terms of the contract.

The journalist Manolo Álvarez collected the various statements made by Jorge Quijano, who guaranteed that Panama would not let itself be blackmailed by the GUPC and that the ACP was prepared to face them in court. 

Canal no se someterá a ningún chantaje de Gupc y los enfrentaremos en cualquier terreno @radiopanama @canaldepanama pic.twitter.com/86r7Almr06

— Manolo Álvarez C (@manoloalvarezc) February 5, 2014

The Canal will not be subjected to any extortion by the GUPC and we will face them no matter the circumstances

Isabel St. Malo, who is running for the vice-presidency under the banner of the Partido Panameñista [en], tweeted her support for the ACP, pledging that the expansion of the Canal would be done with or without the GUPC.

Respaldamos mensaje del administrador Quijano, terminaremos ampliación con o sin GUPC. ACP, orgullo nacional!

— Isabel St. Malo (@IsabelStMalo) February 5, 2014

We endorse the message of Administrator Quijano, we will finish this project with or without GUPC. ACP, national pride!

Martin Torrijos, former President of Panamá and son of General Omar Torrijos—the man who signed the Torrijos-Carter treaties that returned the Canal to Panama—also indicated he stood behind the Administrator and commented that if they were able to make the Canal Panamanian, then surely Panamanians would be able to expand it. 

La ampliación es nuestra,ellos se van nosotros nos quedamos,como dijo Quijano.Cumpliremos con Panamá.Si lo recuperamos,sin duda lo ampliamos

— Martin Torrijos (@MartinTorrijos) February 5, 2014

The expansion project is ours; they will go, we will remain, as Quijano said. We will fulfill our duty to Panama. If we got it back, there's no question we can expand it. 

Popi Varela, a Partido Panameñista deputy, points out that the mistake made by Sacyr, the Spanish firm leading the GUPC, was to believe that the ACP was just like any corrupt government they could blackmail. 

Sacyr piensa que está negociando con un gobierno corrupto no se han dado cuenta que la ACP es autónoma del Gob Central por constitución!

— Popi Varela (@varelapopi) February 5, 2014

Sacyr thinks they are negotiating with a corrupt government and haven't realized that the ACP is independent of the central government according to the constitution!

With its typical sarcasm, El Gallinazo requests that Panamanians not let “gringos” finish the work and that they themselves pick up the tools and complete the expansion project.

Panamá te necesita! No dejemos q los gringos terminen la ampliación. Agarren sus mazos y coas y vamos a terminar esa vaina nosotros mismos!

— El Gallinazo (@ElGallinazo) February 5, 2014

Panama needs you! Don't let the gringos finish the expansion. Grab your hammers and shovels and we'll finish this job ourselves!

Quintín Moreno opines that the GUPC should not be given any more chances and that another company should be found. 

La ACP debe contratar una nueva empresa para finalizar la ampliación, el GUPC demostró ser desleal y oportunista.

— Quintín Moreno (@quintinmoreno) February 5, 2014

The ACP should hire a new firm to finish the expansion; the GUPC has shown itself to be opportunistic and disloyal.

The impact is being felt in Spain, where the share price of Sacyr plummeted when news hit the financial markets. This is how Mi Diario describes it:

Caen acciones de Sacyr en la bolsa española || http://t.co/86Rk3s0iWN || pic.twitter.com/AHJycga4QW

— Mi Diario Panamá (@MiDiarioPanama) February 5, 2014

Shares of Sacyr fell on the Spanish stock market

R.A. Benta says that this is the beginning of the end of the Spanish “brand” and that the real question is, “Who is going to pay for it all?” 

Hoy Sacyr con el canal de Panana, mañana Arabia Saudí con el Ave,quien pagará estas megafiestas? #MarcaEspana #SíSí pic.twitter.com/wZqDrYbmgy

— R.A.Benta#SISI||*|| (@R_A_Benta) February 5, 2014

Today Sacyr with the Panama Canal, tomorrow Saudi Arabia with the Ave [high-speed train], who's picking up the tab for these megaparties?

Quijano's statements, assuring there is still wiggle room in the negotiations, indicate the ACP believes that the GUPC can complete the work. However, when it comes to Panamanians, patience for the manoeuvres of the consortium seems to have run out. 

Categories: Business Feed

Prof lives in a bin to show downsizing

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 8:59am
Dr. Jeff Wilson, aka "Professor Dumpster," will live in a trash bin for one year to prove Americans need to downsize.
Categories: Business Feed

Prof lives in a bin to show downsizing

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 8:59am
Dr. Jeff Wilson, aka "Professor Dumpster," will live in a trash bin for one year to prove Americans need to downsize.
Categories: Business Feed

The business of heroin

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 6:12am
CNN's Randi Kaye rides along with a DEA agent in a Philadelphia neighborhood where heroin is prevalent.
Categories: Business Feed

The business of heroin

CNN - Business Feed - Thu, 02/06/2014 - 6:12am
CNN's Randi Kaye rides along with a DEA agent in a Philadelphia neighborhood where heroin is prevalent.
Categories: Business Feed

Trinidad & Tobago: Strategizing Social Media

Global Voices - Business Feed - Wed, 02/05/2014 - 8:23pm

ICT Pulse recommends 5 critical building blocks upon which organizations can develop an effective social media strategy.

Categories: Business Feed
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